Cracking Open a Few Old Cookbooks

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Here’s some digging into the cookbook archive to catch up a bit on the 52 cookbooks effort. First up, something we did with the bok choy we’ve been getting from our CSA.

Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Roasted Peanuts from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Deborah Madison

3 Tbs. raw peanuts

2 tsp. oil

1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes

1 1/2 lbs. bok choy

2 Tbs. oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 Tbs. minced ginger

2 Tbs. soy sauce

1 tsp. cornstarch  mixed with 3 Tbs. water

Fry peanuts in oil until golden then set aside. Chop bok choy into bite sized pieces. Heat oil, stir-fry bok choy, add garlic and ginger, add soy sauce and cornstarch slurry. Coarsely chop the peanuts with red pepper flakes and add to bok choy.

We had this over rice with some fried tofu and it was fabulous.

 


No picture of this one but it was a nice way to use up a green cabbage. Despite the name this book is not particularly vegan-friendly. Case in point: this cabbage recipe calls for duck fat. Well, it was easy to substitute Earth Balance.

Braised Green Cabbage from Chez Panisse Vegetables by Alice Waters

1 green cabbage, quartered, cored and thinly sliced

1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

3 Tbs. Earth Balance

1 Tbs. cider vinegar

1 bay leaf

1 apple

1/2 c. water

salt & pepper to taste

Cook onion in fat, add cabbage, vinegar, bay leaf, salt & pepper and water. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Grate the apple, add it to the pan and cook another 5 minutes.

 


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Pizza Shop Breadsticks with Sneaky Momma’s Tomato Sauce from Vegan Lunchbox by Jennifer McCann

The tomato sauce has kale, red pepper, and carrots so I figured this was a good way to get the kids to eat some extra vegetables. The bread sticks were rolled in a sesame seed/nutritional yeast mixture, also upping the healthiness a bit. You could do this with any bread recipe and any pasta sauce recipe. I thought it would be fun for the kids and though they weren’t totally sold on it, I thought it was fun.

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Bok Choy, Napa and Tofu Stir Fry

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We’ve been getting lots of bok choy and Napa cabbage from our CSA and they make for a good stir fry. We also added to this one onions, carrots, cashews, tofu, and even a little broccoli from our garden. You can stir fry almost anything you have on hand though. It’s all in the sauce. This is a recipe that we and the kids liked that’s adapted from the Beefy Asparagus Stir Fry recipe in Isa Does It. Just whisk all this stuff together in a bowl then add to your stir fried veggies at the end:

1/2 c. water

1 Tbs. cornstarch

3 Tbs. soy sauce

3 Tbs. hoisin sauce

1 tsp. sriracha (more to taste)

2 Tbs. lime juice

1 Tbs. agave

1 Tbs. sesame oil

1 tsp. grated fresh ginger

We often serve our stir fries over brown rice and sprinkled with sesame seeds. And with the kids, we make everything very mild but I do enjoy some extra sriracha on top too!

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Asian Slaw

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We’ve been getting some nice Napa Cabbage from our CSA and I decided to use some of it to make an Asian slaw. We had also just cooked a batch of chickpeas so in a clash of cultures we served the slaw with falafel. Since we were frying the falafel anyway we also fried some tofu. A tahini dressing for the falafel and tofu rounded out the meal. Here’s the slaw recipe:

What you need:

1 head Napa Cabbage, quartered lengthwise and thinly sliced

1 large carrot, shredded

2 Tbs. minced sweet onion

juice of 1 lime

2 tsp. rice vinegar

1 Tbs. soy sauce

1 Tbs. sesame oil

1 Tbs. canola oil

1/4 tsp. salt

2 Tbs. sesame seeds, plus more for serving

What you do:

In a large bowl, mix together cabbage, carrot and onion. In a small bowl, whisk together lime juice, vinegar, soy sauce, oils and salt. Pour over the cabbage and mix well, then mix in the sesame seeds. If you have time, allow to sit for half an hour. If desired, sprinkle on more sesame seeds when serving.

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Barbecue Seitan with Coleslaw and Kale

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When we got our Instant Pot we also got a copy of JL Fields’ Vegan Pressure Cooking and the recipe we’ve used the most so far is the Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches. We’ve only made it with jackfruit once or twice but the recipe works equally well with seitan or tempeh. Here we used seitan (from one of our favorite seitan recipes that I also mentioned last post). It’s really convenient to do this in the Instant Pot but you could easily do it on the stove top as well. Just saute a small diced onion and minced clove of garlic in a little oil, then add 3 Tbs. tomato paste, 1 tsp. vegan worcestershire sauce, 1 tsp. cider vinegar, 1 Tbs. maple syrup, 1/2 tsp. salt, 1/2 tsp. yellow mustard seeds and about 3/4 cup water. Mix in about 1 pound diced seitan the cook on high pressure for 3 minutes (or cover and simmer for 20 minutes or so on the stove top).

We often like to have coleslaw with our barbecue and I don’t usually use a recipe but this is what I did tonight. Just mix all this stuff together:

1/2 head green cabbage, shredded

2 carrots, shredded

1/4 c. vegan mayo

1 tsp. Dijon mustard

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. onion powder

1 tsp. cider vinegar

And we rounded out the meal with some sauteed kale. What we do with kale most often is just give it a quick saute in a little olive oil with garlic, then add salt and a bit of lemon juice.

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Spring Rolls

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Do you only have spring rolls when dining out at Chinese or Thai restaurants? Why not make them at home? It’s not as hard as you might think. The hardest part for some might be finding the spring roll wrappers but if you have an Asian market nearby it’s likely you can find them there (they’re in the freezer section of our local Asian market). We posted about spring rolls many times on our previous blog and this post has a bit of a recipe and some instructions for wrapping. It’s mostly cabbage, usually carrots, plus whatever else you want to throw in – tonight that happened to be tofu and kale. The key here is that if you’re nervous about or otherwise turned off by deep frying, well there’s another way. We deep fry these on occasion but they come out pretty good just by rolling them a little flat and frying in a shallow pan with a generous amount of canola oil. You can try baking them too.

It’s nice to have a good dipping sauce to go along with these and our usual recipe is to whisk together 1/3 c. apricot jam, 2 Tbs. soy sauce, 1 Tbs. rice vinegar, and 1 tsp. sesame oil. They can be a meal by themselves or you can serve them with some noodles or fried rice or whatever else suits your fancy.

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It had been quite a while since we made spring rolls but they used to be a regular go-to meal and I think they may become so again because they’re so delicious!

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Mitch’s Vegetarian Chili

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Here’s a recipe that goes back a very long time but we still make it on occasion – vegetarian chili from Mitch’s Tavern in Raleigh, NC. Tonight I experimented with making it in the pressure cooker. Check out our post on our previous blog for the original recipe (or get it straight from the Mitch’s Tavern site). If you have a pressure cooker it’s even easier. Here’s the variation I made tonight. I just put all these ingredients into our Instant Pot and cooked on high pressure for 20 minutes.

1/4 c. split peas
1/4 c. brown lentils
1 1/2 c. dried red beans, soaked for several hours and drained
4 c. chopped green cabbage
1 medium onion, cut into 1/2″ dice
4 c. water
4 medium carrots, diced
5 stalks celery, diced
1 tsp. dried basil
1/3 c. chopped fresh cilantro
3-4 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 Tbs. chili powder
1 28-oz. can crushed tomatoes

The chili was fabulous and so was the appetizer. We just got a good deal on a big bunch of plantains and I made tostones for the first time. I’ve fried ripe plantains many times before but I’ve never used them green. They’re less sweet this way but equally delicious. I used the recipe from Terry Hope Romero’s Vegan Eats World, but if you don’t have that one just Google tostones and you’ll find many recipes.

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Omaha Yakisoba

A quick post to let you know we’re still here. And that we’ve really been enjoying cooking from Isa Does It. Many nights we’re just whipping up something quick without taking the time to look in a cookbook but when we do decide to cook from a recipe (or at least find one to use as a guide) this has been our go-to book. Tonight we had a red cabbage we needed to use and Isa’s Omaha Yakisoba recipe was a great way to use that cabbage. Alas, we didn’t have udon noodles but it was quite tasty with the whole wheat linguine we did have.

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